Water Quality Challenges

Both phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrients for the plants and animals that make up the aquatic food web. Since phosphorus is the nutrient in short supply (limiting nutrient) in most fresh waters, even a modest increase in phosphorus can, under the right conditions, set off a whole chain of undesirable events in an aquatic system, including accelerated plant growth, algae blooms, low dissolved oxygen, and resulting die-offs of fish, invertebrates, and other aquatic animals.

There are many sources of phosphorus, both natural and those resulting from human activity. These include soil and rocks, wastewater treatment plant discharges, runoff from fertilized lawns and cropland, failing septic systems, runoff from animal manure storage areas, disturbed land areas, drained wetlands, water treatment, and commercial cleaning preparations.

Phosphorus cycles through the environment, changing form as it does so (Fig. 5.12). Aquatic plants take in dissolved inorganic phosphorus and convert it to organic phosphorus as it becomes part of their tissues. Animals get the organic phosphorus they need by eating either aquatic plants, other animals, or decomposing plant and animal material.

As plants and animals excrete wastes or die, the organic phosphorus they contain sinks to the bottom, where bacterial decomposition converts it back to inorganic phosphorus, both dissolved and attached to particles. This inorganic phosphorus gets back into the water column when the bottom is stirred up by animals, human activity, chemical interactions, or water currents. Then it is taken up by plants and the cycle begins again.

 

edex_bio_eutrophication-1

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/edexcel/problems_in_environment/pollutionrev4.shtml

 

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